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Aggression

This category contains 9 posts

1) Social Learning Theory

Albert Bandura said aggression is learnt by observing others. Observation – Bandura said children learn their aggressive responses through observation, this means watching the behaviour of role models and then imitating that behaviour. This idea that the person had to be a role model in order for Children to copy the behaviour contradicts the earlier … Continue reading

2) Deindividuation

Deindividuation is when people lose their sense of individual identity. Most individuals would normally refrain from aggression because they don’t want to be held to blame for their actions – but in situations such as crowds, social restraints and personal responsibility are perceived to be lessened, so displays of aggressive behaviour occur. It can be … Continue reading

3) Institutional Aggression

A survey by the NHS found over 84,000 cases of violence of aggression against staff in 2000/01 in British health institutes alone. Prisons have a similarly high level, with over 26,000 prisoner-prisoner assaults in US prisons in 2002, with 83 deaths resulting from these conflicts. Explanations of institutional aggression The importation model – Irwin and … Continue reading

4) Neural Mechanisms in Aggression

The biological explanations of aggression say that aggression is caused by differences in the biological make-up of individuals. One example of these biological differences that could cause aggression is neural mechanisms. Neurotransmitters Neurotransmitters are chemicals which trigger a response in the brain, serotonin and dopamine are both examples of neurotransmitters which are thought to influence … Continue reading

5) Hormonal Mechanisms in Aggression

The biological explanations of aggression say that aggression is caused by differences in the biological make-up of individuals. One example of these biological differences that could cause aggression is hormonal mechanisms. Testosterone Testosterone is the male sex hormone and is thought to influence aggression as it affects the areas of the brain which are involved … Continue reading

6) Genetic factors

The biological explanations of aggression say that aggression is caused by differences in the biological make-up of individuals. One example of these biological differences that could cause aggression is genetic factors. We are unsure of why there may be a link between genetics and aggression; however research has found a correlation. Twin Studies – Monozygotic … Continue reading

7) Evolutionary explanations of aggression

The evolutionary explanations say that aggression is driven by our need to reproduce with a suitable partner, when something such as infidelity or cuckoldry threatens this we act in an aggression manner. Daly and Wilson (1998) say that men have evolved different ways of trying to stop their female partners from committing adultery, and several … Continue reading

8) Group displays of aggression – sport

Group displays of aggression are used frequently in sport. One explanation of this is that by acting in an aggressive manner you will perform better and your opponent will be intimidated. This will mean you will win; gaining a higher status which means you will attract a mate and be able to reproduce. Xenophobia – … Continue reading

9) Group displays of aggression – War

War is the formation of a group to attack others within the same species. From an evolutionary point of view, there are two main advantages of war. One is the expansion or defence of territory, therefore more resources. Also those who win a war gain higher status. Both of these points allow the victors to … Continue reading